Our Blog: The Standard

Ten Tiny Teaching Tips To Try Today
Anne Gardner, NBCTFebruary 26, 2020

This blog was originally posted at Common Core Connection USA. From the minute the kids arrive, to the time you get home at night, we’ve got some Tiny Teaching Tips That Can Make a BIG Difference! Help your kids feel seen, from the moment they enter the classroom in the morning! 1. Use Photos and Binder Clips to Make Movable Pieces! These can be used as kids sign in (attendance), or even to select their lunch choices. They are also handy to show whether someone is in the restroom or for playing pieces for board games. Another thought. . . Personalize magnets, like Kadeen does,…

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The Need for a Discipline Change in K-12 Public Schools
Kimberly Bone, NBCTFebruary 18, 2020

Think about it.  How has the approach to discipline in K-12 public schools changed?  Not much.  If you had knowledge of another person’s experiences —  what they see, what they hear, and/or what they feel, would it change the way you would respond to this individual?  If I had to guess, it would.  Behaviors are learned things, good or bad.  Children aren’t born destined to be good or bad.  They see.  They imitate.  They do what they have LEARNED!  Since all learning is social by nature, strong relationships fostered by restorative practices play a powerful gatekeeping role. As a process,…

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Logical Steps Through Darkness: The Path Toward #NBCT
Jess Ledbetter, NBCTJanuary 30, 2020

This blog originally appeared online in Stories From School, Arizona Are you working on National Board Certification or coaching NB candidates? I have this little mantra that’s become a good friend over the years. I want to share it with you and tell you what it means to me: Logical steps forward through darkness This mantra got me through National Board Certification. This mantra helped me continue when the directions seemed vague and I did not have the answers yet. This mantra gave me the space to become a reflective practitioner and overcome the fear that I was making missteps.…

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Sometimes life gets in the way, but that doesn’t mean give up
Edie Guerra, NBCTJanuary 13, 2020

On August 13, 2016 I began my National Board journey. Little did I know at this time I would also embark on another journey. Because my school district and teacher’s union supports National Board, I was able to encourage 10 teachers at my school to join me in this work. The local union arranged for educators to provide us with support, meeting regularly, reading our portfolios and doing what they could to help make us successful. It’s also worth noting that our union also provided financial supports. There is much to learn – the standards and more – and the…

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We need to change our high-school students’ expectations about teacher feedback
Ray Salazar, NBCTJanuary 7, 2020

At the beginning of the year, my Chicago Public Schools high-school students expressed lots of frustration because I didn’t write any comments on their first major essay. “You need to give us feedback,” they demanded. Some doubted I read their essays because I didn’t make a mark. I explained that one of my goals as a teacher has become to build my students’ independence, thus fighting against the image of students stretching out their hands like fans at a rock concert, fluttering their paper for the teacher’s attention. I also fight against the ugly co-dependence that arises when teachers feel…

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Asset-Based Grading to Reward Students for What They Know
Noah Prince, NBCTDecember 17, 2019

Teachers can adopt better grading strategies to reward students for the knowledge they’ve gained, instead of penalizing them for what they haven’t yet mastered My son’s first grade teacher told me that he was lucky to have a younger sister. Six-year-olds are not known for their empathy, and part of Mrs. Seabolt’s job was to build that trait in her students. She’d often see children impatient with classmates who couldn’t tie their shoes or recite their addition tables. Students with younger siblings had an easier time understanding why that behavior wasn’t kind. They recognized, after all, that it was inappropriate…

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Racism, Privilege and Implicit Bias: One Teacher’s Journey, Part 2
Ben Lathrop, NBCTDecember 16, 2019

Last week I wrote about my personal journey to a better understanding of my own white privilege and implicit biases. This week, I would like to suggest three concrete steps white teachers like me can take to acknowledge and address issues of systemic racism in our schools. We can actively decide to set aside our defensive attitudes. Like many white people, I tend to bristle when accused of having implicit biases or, worse, “being racist,” and that response is understandable. As teachers and learners, however, we can acknowledge that we have a lot to learn from the experiences of others.…

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Racism, Privilege and Implicit Bias: One Teacher’s Journey, Part 1
Ben Lathrop, NBCTDecember 6, 2019

I can vividly remember the first time I encountered racism. A white student, a senior in high school, had just finished reading Richard Wright’s Native Son. It was, to my knowledge, the first book by an African-American writer that he had ever read. Another white student asked him whether it was difficult to read. “Well, no,” he said. “I mean, the author is black.” “That’s racist!” she replied. And of course, she was right. It was a good thing she said something, because until that moment, the student had never really given any thought to his implicit biases or entertained…

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Keep on Staying
Michelle Morgan, NBCTDecember 3, 2019

After a long day at school, I will get on my phone and see what stories are in the news.  I read lots of articles about teaching.  Recently, I have been reading too many accounts of why teachers have chosen to leave the profession entirely.  I find this distressing. Teaching is my second career.  My undergraduate degree is in advertising, and my first career was as an account manager for an advertising agency.  I thought it would be exciting, but I did not enjoy it.  I wasn’t really connecting with anyone and I wasn’t making a difference. I decided I…

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Stop Celebrating Teacher Self Sacrifice
Lory Peroff, NBCTNovember 18, 2019

“My son’s teacher woke up early to attend his 8am baseball game & cheer him on the sidelines!  She makes sure to attend one extracurricular activity for EVERY one of her students.  Her love and support is so special.” “Mr. Tom is such a great teacher.  He wakes up early every morning to get to school and stays late every night working tirelessly with students.” “Mrs. Ching is an outstanding educator who brings in healthy snacks from home every day to make sure all her students have a nutritious breakfast.” Social media is full of these feel good posts. These…

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