Our Blog: The Standard

Home Our Blog: The Standard

I Was Determined!
Erica Reid, NBCTDecember 12, 2018

My journey for National Board Certification was a long one! I felt the sting of disappointment three times. The first two I questioned myself as an educator. Was I in the wrong profession? Was I not an effective teacher? I was following the guidelines down to the letter. Why wasn’t I certifying? Still, I tried again. I knew I could do it. I just had to work a little harder. Results came on my third attempt, and, yet again, I did not certify. This time I was not only disappointed, but, I was angry. At myself, at National Board, the…

Read More
Student perspective: I knew this would be a good class
Alex KleinDecember 11, 2018

As a 7th grader, I’ve had lots of teachers. Some have known me well and others not so much. Some teachers make learning fun and others don’t. I recently talked to my friends about why Ms. Kaiser, my World Studies teacher, is so good – why do we like her, why are we learning so much and why do kids who don’t normally participate in class pay attention during this class? My friend Will said that Ms. Kaiser is funny and makes lessons really interesting. Amanda Keiser, NBCT Ethan told me that she relates to her…

Read More
National Board Certification: Be teachable, and let the “fun” begin
Kyle Bragg, NBCTDecember 10, 2018

Becoming a National Board Certified Teacher (NBCT) can seem like an insurmountable task. It is a process that pushed me out of my comfort zone as I began to write and reflect on my teaching practice.  I quickly learned I need to allow myself to be “teachable” to be successful through the process. An important step I took in reaching out to others was to join my district cohort. Here, I met people going through the same process. We were fortunate to have many excellent NBCT’s leading our cohort, including Bobbie Faulkner and Susan Leonard. Faulkner is one of the…

Read More
My Journey to West Virginia State Teacher of the Year
Jada Reeves, NBCTDecember 5, 2018

I was broken down and defeated. I did not love teaching anymore.  I was doing the same thing over and over and was bored. I needed a change.  I even contemplated changing careers. Then, one day, I was assisting in a 2nd grade classroom.  I look back and remember where I was in that room and which desks I was standing beside when the thought came through my head:  I need to do something!  I began thinking back to my college days when our professors spoke to us of National Board Certification.  I knew I always wanted to achieve this…

Read More
Principal (Teacher?): “Everyone a leader, everyone a learner.”
Jonathon Medeiros, NBCTNovember 27, 2018

I clearly remember when I first heard that phrase, regarded as a rapidly tiring cliché by many working in the Hawaii public school system. I was at a lunch meeting a few years ago, when about 20 other Hawaii State Teacher Fellows and I were joined by then Deputy Superintendent Stephen Schatz. We were discussing the forward direction of the Hawaii DOE and hoped for change in the paradigm that predominated educational administration in Hawaii. The crux of Schatz’s belief is shared ownership over the school system, from teaching to curriculum to school design to administration. “Everyone a leader, everyone…

Read More
Why a Great Teacher is Not Enough
Joshua Ray, NBCTNovember 26, 2018

In some schools, a great teacher can be used to do more harm than good. Where there are clearly identified “good” and “bad” teachers, often parents demand their child be placed in certain classes, staff members feel jealous, leaders are perceived to pick favorites, and achievement gaps develop across differing levels of instruction in the building. Where greatness is celebrated in isolation in schools, only a select group of kids benefit. Additionally, the principal who allows great teaching to remain in isolation must then accept the responsibility of choosing which children to exclude from the best his school has to…

Read More
7 Experiences New Teachers Should Seek Out for a More Satisfying Career
David B. Cohen, NBCTNovember 15, 2018

Congratulations, or belated congratulations, on starting your new (still relatively new) career! While teaching could certainly be a more lucrative profession, it offers a variety of rewarding experiences you can’t find in any other work. The relationships we build with students, families, and communities can be powerful, even transformative. Knowing the work our fellow teachers are doing, we also have the opportunity to make contributions to our profession, and indirectly affect the learning and the lives of even more students. If your teaching preparation was like mine, and like that of most teachers I know, you may have focused so…

Read More
Bald Caps and Basquiat: How the Arts Transform Learning
Jeff Fessler, NBCTNovember 9, 2018

When I was nine, I auditioned for a musical and in my first ever role played a bald, evil king in a purple satin robe. I discovered two things: (1) I was passionate about theatre, and (2) not so passionate about wearing a bald cap. Bald caps aside, I marvel at how that single theatrical experience shaped my future. From that time on I performed in every school production, sang in choirs, was a traveling drama troupe actor during two summers in high school, participated in oratorical contests, and started at the University of Illinois as a theatre major. And…

Read More
From NBCT to TIME Magazine
NaShonda Cooke, NBCTNovember 6, 2018

I remember it like it was yesterday. Sitting in my principal’s office… typing in my information to log on… and when I did I saw the words, I honestly wasn’t expecting to see them: CONGRATULATIONS!!!! YOU ARE A NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFIED TEACHER! My heart stopped and all I remember is screaming at the top of my lungs and my principal rushing in to make sure everything was okay. It was the most amazing professional moment of my career. Me… an NBCT! Well, that was only the beginning. Since then I have served as a mentor and advocate for public education…

Read More
The Moral Imperative of Voting – Civic Education Begins at Home
Jana Bryant, NBCTOctober 30, 2018

Recently, my young adult children informed me that there are two “taboo” topics that shouldn’t be discussed around the kitchen table or at family gatherings: politics and religion. So, if politics isn’t discussed at these events, then when are future young voters getting the opportunity to engage in purposeful conversation with their peers, their families, and other community members to become informed in local politics? According to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University, roughly 50% of 18- to 29-year-olds voted in the 2016 election. However, less than 20% of young people eligible to…

Read More

Recent Bloggers

Authors